Girl With Papier Mache Urn: Lydia J. A. Bade Rohlfing

Cabinet card portrait of Lydia Bade Rohlfing, found by Kathy Wieland of FamilyWe Search.com.

This portrait of an awkward teenage girl teetering on the edge of womanhood was identified as “Lydia Bade (Mrs. Arnold Rohlfing).”

Born 20 March 1880 in Franklin County, Missouri to German immigrant farmer William F. Bade and Johanna Elizabeth Peters Bade, Lydia married Franklin County farmer Arnold P. Rohlfing about 1900. The Rohlfings had three children: Florence, Oliver L., and Irwin W. Rohlfing.

The awkwardness of adolescence is magnified by the incongruous setting: Tall, skinny Lydia, in a black  dress stretched tight over her thin  chest, stands by a papier mache faux urn that is just beginning to tip from the pressure of her hand.

Her dress’s fashionable standing-puff sleeves place the photo ca. early 1890s. Contemporary fashion advice for young ladies advised that “frocks . . . should increase in length with advancing years until at age twelve they should reach the ankle” (Ladies Home Journal, May 1891, quoted in Severa, Dressed for the Photographer (Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1995). Her hair is done in up-to-date fashion, pulled back tightly into a knot, with a curled fringe of bangs.

The white card mount with blind-embossed decorative edges and a more subdued advertising design also locates this cabinet card photograph in the 1890s.

Lydia Bade Rohlfing died “six miles south of Berger,” in rural Boeuf Township, Franklin County, on 19 Nov 1943. She and her husband are buried in Senate Grove Cemetery, Berger.

mumbrauer_logo

Emma Trautwein and Joda Allen, 1894

Cabinet photograph of Emma Trautwein and Joda Allen (found by Kathy Wieland), Mumbrauer Studio, 1894.

Emma Julia Trautwein (1868-1943) and Joda, aka John, M. Allen, both of Bollinger County, Missouri, were married on 15 August 1894 in Lutesville, Bollinger County. This Robert C. Mumbrauer cabinet card photograph, found by Kathy Wieland,  memorializes their wedding. Because it was taken in Hermann, I suspected they had relations there.

Based on my research, Emma was the daughter of Ferdinand P. Trautwein (1841-1909) and Amelia H. Guntner Trautwein (1849-1913), who are buried in Hermann City Cemetery.

Ferdinand Trautwein was a miller. “Trautwein’s Mill” is mentioned twice in Anna Kemper Hesse’s book Little Germany on the Missouri: The Photographs of Edward Kemper.  Hesse locates the Trautwein mill as in the First Creek area. It was, she relates, the place chosen in the fall of 1864 as a bivouac by a “a group of Confederate officers in the vanguard of General Price’s army” (p. 75)

Emma’s uncle Eduard Trautwein married Jacobine Langendoerfer, the daughter of Roark Township farmer Francis J. (aka Franz Jacob) Langendoerfer, whose sons Fritz and August became well-known viticulturists and vintners in Hermann.  In 1867 they built the St. Charles Wine Hall, later known as “The Landing,” at 4 Schiller Street in Hermann. The building is now a restaurant called Simon’s on the Waterfront.

Explore more about the Langendoerfer family in David V. Agricola’s book on Langendoerfer genealogy. According to his research, Franz Jacob Langendoerfer immigrated to the Hermann area in 1838 and started cultivating grapes on Frene Creek in 1843.

I have not yet been able to determine much about Joda Allen except that he may have been born in Indiana. Emma identified herself as a widow in the 1910 census, when she was living in St. Louis with a son, accountant John Edward F. Allen, and her mother Amelia.

Emma is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, possibly in St. Louis County, but as there are about 20 cemeteries named Oak Grove in Missouri, her actual place of burial is not yet certain.

Published in: on September 18, 2010 at 5:56 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , , ,

The Gnadts and the Tschapplers of Osage County, Missouri

Karen Barton, a native of Chamois, Osage County, has generously shared a number of family photos taken by Robert C. Mumbrauer and son Charles.  As Karen teaches me about her family tree, I will post her Mumbrauer portraits.

Osage Co. farmer Ludwig Julius Gnadt (b. 1846, Pommern) married Augusta Steinke (b. 1850, Osage Co.) in 1871. Mumbrauer photgraphed the couple in a conventional marital pose of the period, ca. 1910 (personal collection of Karen Hanson).

Ludwig Julius Gnadt (b. 5 July 1846, Pommern) and Samuel Tschappler (b. Osage County, Mo.) were neighboring farmers in Benton Township, Osage County. Samuel married one of Julius’ younger sisters, Ernestina Marie Gnadt (b. 1854, Pommern).

One of Samuel and Ernestina’s sons, Herbert John Tschappler (b. 1890, Osage Co.), became both a farmer and an engineer.

The portrait of Herbert below was taken by Mumbrauer Sr. around 1908. The young man, wearing a soft western-style hat, has turned his handsome, straightforward gaze slightly away from the camera.

Farmer and engineer Herbert John Schappler (b. 1890, Fredericksburg, Gasconade Co.), had his portrait taken by Mumbrauer ca. 1908 (personal collection of Karen Barton).

Robert C. Mumbrauer: Hermann’s First Photographer

Mumbrauer Studio 1892

Robert C. Mumbrauer’s Photography Studio in Hermann, Missouri, 1892. Note displays of photographs.

Robert C. Mumbrauer’s photography studio on Schiller Street, in Hermann, Missouri, was built in 1892. An 1892 Sanborn Fire Insurance map shows the location of the studio at Schiller and East Second streets (see link at right). The building  has been continuously occupied by photographers for 110 years.

After Mumbrauer’s sudden death in 1917, son Charles George Mumbrauer took over the photography business until his death in 1935. The Mumbrauers’ small  home on East Second Street, built about 1887, is just around the corner and still in use as a bed and breakfast called the Mumbrauer Gasthaus.

Hermann Photography Studio 1950s

The studio as it appeared in the 1950s under the Powers name

From 1935 to 1952, it was known as the Powers Studio. William Fricke bought the business from Powers and ran it until the 1980s, when his son, Brad Fricke, stepped in.

The current owner, photographer Bryon Raterman, took over the Fricke name in 1993.

Fricke Studio, Hermann Missouri

The Fricke Studio Today

Although the building facade, entrance and display windows were drastically altered over the years, Mumbrauer’s initials remain visible.

Robert C. Mumbrauer was born in a place called Schelda, in the Kingdom of Hannover, in 1851. He arrived in Hermann with his parents, Karl and Friederike Sophia Thiene Mumbrauer, before 1860.

Mumbrauer's Initials in Building Facade

Robert Mumbrauer’s initials and the date he built the studio

Karl Mumbrauer was a tailor. During the Civil War,  Karl served in Company B of the 4th Missouri Infantry. He survived, returned home and took up tailoring again.

Friederike died in 1901, and Karl followed in 1903.

Reverse of an R. C. Mumbrauer carte de visite, on green card stock, of an unidentified woman and children (found by Kathy Wieland).

Reverse of an R. C. Mumbrauer carte de visite, on green card stock, of an unidentified woman and children (found by Kathy Wieland).

Robert’s path was different.He taught himself how to use a camera, trained in St. Louis for a year,  and traveled  the Missouri River valley with  a mobile studio, taking photos of Gasconade, Osage, and Franklin County settlers.

In 1873, he married Amelia Carey. After continuing to do peripatetic portrait work for several years, he was able to settle down to business in Hermann around 1876.

His stock in trade would have been the cabinet card–a roughly 4″ x 6″ paper photograph mounted on a variety of pressboard or cardboard backgrounds, usually with the studio name and location on front, back, or both.

Reverse of cabinet card photo of a middle-aged couple, Mumbrauer Studio.

Reverse of cabinet card photo of a middle-aged couple, Mumbrauer Studio.

The studio business made it possible for. Robert and Ameiia to build a home on Second Street, where they raised seven children: Albert, Margaret Mumbrauer Epperson, Charles, Walter, Rosa Mumbrauer Locher, Ella Mumbrauer Petrus, and Frances Mumbrauer McCarty.

Albert attended the School of Fine Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, then came back to Hermann. Walter and his wife, Emma Kurrelmeyer Mumbrauer, moved to St. Louis.

Robert,  Robert’s parents, Robert’s wife Amelia, and their children Albert, Walter, Charles, and Ella are buried in Hermann Cemetery. Margaret is entombed in the mausoleum.

Reverse of an R. C. Mumbrauer cabinet card portrait of a young child.

Reverse of an R. C. Mumbrauer cabinet card portrait of a young child.

Robert, and then his son, Charles George Mumbrauer, documented the people of Hermann and environs for about 65 years. Some of his photo cabinet cards are marked New Haven and Chamois, nearby villages on the Missouri.

Their work is scattered in a thousand family albums–cabinet cards, cartes de visite, and photographic postcards portraying the life of the people around them, indoors and out. What happened to their vast collection? If you know, I’d like to hear. Contact me at waldonia2000 [at] gmail [dot] com.

Infinite thanks  to Bryon Raterman, who shared photos of the Hermann studio building with me and told me about the history of the building. Deepest gratitude to Kathy Wieland, of FamilyWeSearch.com, who has found a number of Mumbrauer photographs and shares my interest in this project.

Read an 1888  biographical sketch of Robert Mumbrauer.

mumbrauer_logo

You can view Bryon Raterman’s work at www.frickestudio.com.